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Live Boards
#21
Andy Howie Wrote:I suppose the reality is, I am to blame for this mess...

Simply not true Andy. I think I speak for the vast majority when I say that these boards add a new dimension to a Congress which allows an event to be enjoyed by the wider Chess community. Most players relish the opportunity to have their games broadcast live online. I'm really grateful that you put in the time and effort to get the boards functioning at most major events.

I understand the difficulties faced by the tournament directors, but - with respect - they did not refuse to have the live boards as part of their event. I think it's fair for them to assume that players who are asked to play on them will respectfully do so and not moan about something as trivial. Even if players could prepare for your openings as a result, who cares? As Andy points out there is no shortage of opportunity to do that anyway. The IM clearly has the ability to play a good game on the board irrespective.
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#22
haha we should club together and write a book, "Mannion's Best Games", all proceeds to the DGT boards fund.
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#23
We shouldn't forget that Steve has been one of the most loyal supporters of weekend congresses for as long as I can remember and has done lots of great work with Scottish juniors as well as being a stalwart of our international teams for over two decades!

If he has made a 'mistake' or an error of judgement then it's not a very serious one in the grand scheme of things and at least now we can have a debate about the live boards issue and ensure we get things ironed out for the future.
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#24
andyburnett Wrote:If he has made a 'mistake' or an error of judgement then it's not a very serious one in the grand scheme of things and at least now we can have a debate about the live boards issue and ensure we get things ironed out for the future.

Yeah, this seems a little out of proportion somehow. I'm more curious than anything else, Steve has one of the most solid and steady repertoires in Scottish chess which most top players know about. Maybe he's got a big novelty/new opening?
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#25
Yes there was a new opening: h3 vs the Najdorf/Shev instead of his good old f4! Tongue. Looked like a nice game.
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#26
Quote:We shouldn't forget that Steve has been one of the most loyal supporters of weekend congresses for as long as I can remember and has done lots of great work with Scottish juniors as well as being a stalwart of our international teams for over two decades!


how true ! Many others would do well to follow his example.
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#27
It does seem unfortunate that the game of the event played on board 1 on Sunday morning was not broadcast. At time I assumed the board was switched on; what a missed opportunity. If I hadn't been in Oban myself I am sure I would have been tuned in (in fact really ought to have been paying more attention to my own game at the time Sad ) .

On the general principle of it all, my view is that it is entirely the organiser's discretian what they do on case by case basis but would hope the bias is towards broadcasting top boards wherever possible. Anything that makes chess in Scotland available to a wider audience can only be good thing in my opinion.
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#28
Personally I don't really like playing on digital boards (I was gutted when I got a digital board in first two rounds of SNCL :\), although I'm kind of resigned to it being way of the future and at least from spectator's viewpoint I can see how it's beneficial so maybe in 5 to 10 years time it will be no different to digital clocks that are now regularly used instead of old analogue ones. I suspect one of the problems at least from my perspective is that as chess sets are a slightly different model to ones used universally in chess clubs throughout scotland that I find piece recognition a bit awkward and pieces aren't as familiar as I'm used to.

I've also seen some people mention that it's an honour to play on digital boards. Logically it would seem that best solution that should keep everyone happy is to ensure that people who consider it an honour to play on digital boards do so while people who want to avoid them don't have to play on them. This means that for example in case of Oban congress simplest solution would have been to switch board 1 and board 5 so you would have boards 2-5 broadcast and board 1 with person who didn't want a digital board not having it.

Of course problem is that organisers rarely know in advance if someone will refuse to play on a digital board and inherent problem isn't refusal itself but rather short notice. Solution to that is simply to have a digital opt out box in entry form so let's say you get a standard congress you get let's say a £20 entry fee, £2 CS/junior etc discount and then a £2 fee to be guaranteed not to play on a digital board. When draw is made cards with scores can have a red sticker to indicate opt out and top x boards with both players willing to play on digital boards play on them. I'm all for top boards in every event being broadcast instead of just open. If organisers want titled players to play on digital boards they simply need to specify that free entry for titled players is only available if they do not opt out. Irony is that with that solution you could potentially fund digital boards for congresses from players who don't want to use them.

I would also like to add that work everyone has done to raise money for sensory boards is a good thing for chess in scotland and that all the hard work is appreciated.
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#29
If I recall correctly, Oban did not offer free entry to titled players, at least not on the entry form.
Oban did not advertise the live boards.
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#30
Perhaps the arbiters are the best placed to confirm Kenny but I don't see how an opt-out is feasible. Having run a couple of Congresses it would appear to me to be an administrative nightmare and add to the workload that event organisers already have to deal with.

I'd rather see Chess players join the 21st century and accept that live boards are the way forward for our game. Absolutely anything which can spread Chess to a wider audience is a good thing for promotional purposes and raising interest with sponsors, and the knock-on positives of this are potentially massive. We collectively moan about a lack of interest in Chess (and the absence of Chess on tv), yet when we get an opportunity to spread our game ourselves many people would rather not? I just don't get it.

Do we want our game to die out? We aren't going to attract new players to the game with distant memories of Kasparov playing super computers forever. We need new, innovative, and interesting ways of getting our beautiful game to the masses.
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