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I am sorry to report the passing of Stevie Hilton on 16th April, one of the real characters of our game. We are endeavouring to find out the funeral arrangements and hopefully will let you know.
from Iain Fraser

"I first met Steve Hilton about 40 years ago when Prestwick played Inverclyde in the Spens Cup and I have been friends with him since then.

He played in the Ayrshire league for Irvine and then joined my club Prestwick helping us win the Ayrshire league. I remember playing Steve in the final of the Ayrshire Lightning and he was just too quick for me as he won the Championship.

Steve was a regular at most weekend tournaments and he won the Nancy Elder numerous times. He always enjoyed a good game of chess and this past time took him all over the world where he made many friends.


Sadly Steve suffered from ill health which meant he could no longer play the game he loved.

Steve will be missed by all in the Chess community. "
Where do I start
Stevie has won the Nancy elder more times than anyone else I believe and his international career as part of of his involvement with the blind community wont be surpassed. Stevie has also been honoured with a civic reception to honour his achievements, but the Stevie we all know is the one we all have stories of, with his participation in the Glasgow and Ayrshire Leagues. Stevie was also outspoken in the forum and whether you agreed with him or not, at least you knew what you were thinking. Stevie also served as a director for Chess Scotland, and made an unsuccessful run for President. Stevie's last tournament was his beloved Nancy Elder tournament in which he was runner up. However Covid and other obstacle's meant he never received his trophy which I have in front of me as I write this. I could write about the many funny stories I know about him but I know I shouldn't. He was a decent man and I agree wholeheartedly, he will be sorely missed.
from Alistair Maxwell
 "I stayed with him during the 1985 Inverclyde Congress. I had entered late on and asked "are any top players playing" and was assured that there were not.
Pulling into the train station Steve had offered to meet me and he was standing beside someone who looked suspiciously like Mark Condie...
Obviously Karpov, Kasparov were not playing...."
Ok I've got to share this one
One boxing day Stevie phoned me to say he was in hospital and believed "he was on the way out" . To be fair he was having some health issues but what was making matters worse he was in the very same bed his father had died in and he feared the worst. Stevie used to phone me regular with his thoughts regarding Chess Scotland but I felt this was the end. You can imagine my surprise, three weeks later Stepps were playing Paisley and to my shock Stevie was bounding up the stairs racing to get to his board as he was slightly late. I had never known him to run that fast so I shouted at him (and I known I was being smart or in shock) "Stevie , I thought you were dying?" to which he replied " I know but they (Paisley) dragged me out of my deathbed to play this game"
That says it all, Rest in Peace Stevie
I'm really sorry to hear about Steven. I first met him around 40 years ago when we played in one of the individual tournaments. I probably still have the game. No doubt it will be the Nancy Elder. The janitor was kicking us out of the venue at Cardinal Newman high school as the longer time control meant we'd overrun 10pm. I was going to resign but Steven was good enough to seal a move and we continued at my parents house. He won. Shortly after that he suffered a terrible family tragedy and I felt that he never got over that and his health deteriorated shortly after.
Rest in Peace.
From Alistair Maxwell
"I stayed with him during the 1985 Inverclyde Congress. I had entered late on and asked "are any top players playing" and was assured that there were not.
Pulling into the train station Steve had offered to meet me and he was standing beside someone who looked suspiciously like Mark Condie...
Obviously Karpov, Kasparov were not playing...."
I'm sad to hear about Stevie's death.  I first met him about forty years ago and had a number of interesting games against him at congresses and on one occasion at his house in the Nancy Elder.

I admired both how he maintained his standard of play as his sight deteriorated and his work for blind players.  He's a loss to Scottish chess.