Richardson Cup 1926

The first match of the final (a replay was required) was held in the rooms of the Glasgow CC on Saturday, March 27. These teams had faced each other in the 1925 final, when Central came out victorious. This time, however, Glasgow reversed the result.

Both teams were strongly represented. On the top board Gibson came out of a complicated position the exchange down, and although he made a stubborn resistance, it was no use against Gilchrist. On the second board McKee played a Scotch Opening against MacIsaac, succeeded in breaking up his opponent's kingside pawns, and obtained slightly the better position. The advantage, however, was not sufficient to win, and a draw was agreed upon.

Meanwhile, Wardhaugh had much the worst of things against Birch. The former took his queen out of play trying to win a pawn and lost the exchange, and finally the game.

Murray and Draper played a Ruy Lopez, ending in a draw. Forrester succeeded in winning a pawn, and by careful play nursed his advantage to a win. The remaining two games between Marshall and Walsworth and McGrouther and Smith were unfinished, and have been sent for adjudication. [The score standing at 3-2 for Glasgow CC.]

Bd
Glasgow
Central
1
W. Gibson
0
1
J. Gilchrist
2
J.A. McKee
½
½
D.M. MacIsaac
3
J. Birch
1
0
C. Wardhaugh
4
A. Murray
½
½
J.R. Draper
5
J. Marshall
A
A
H.N.J. Walsworth
6
Dr Forrester
1
0
R.C. Borland
7
J. McGrouther
A
A
A. Smith
   
4
3
 

The above details, with the text adapted and abridged, is from the report in The Scotsman of Monday, March 29, 1926.

The British Chess Magazine did not, strangely enough, give any details of the final. The only report I can find is on page 271 of the June issue which says:-

" The Richardson Cup has resulted in a tie between Glasgow and Glasgow Central, and as the replay also produced a drawn match, these clubs will consider themselves entitled to divide the honours."

However, The Scotsman of Monday, October 4 1926 gives a further, detailed, report with full results of individual games. There is no mention of the results of the adjudicated games from the above table.

Bd
Glasgow
Central
1
W. Gibson
½
½
J. Gilchrist
2
J.A. McKee
1
0
D.M. MacIsaac
3
J. Birch
0
1
C. Wardhaugh
4
A. Murray
1
0
J.R. Draper
5
J.R. Longwill
½
½
H.N.J. Walsworth
6
J.M. Nichol
1
0
A. Smith
7
J. Young
½
½
R.C. Borland
   
 

The Central CC fielded the same team, the only difference being that Smith and Borland swapped the sixth and seventh boards.

The Glasgow CC team was changed on the lower three boards. Dr Forrester and J. McGrouther were not able to play, and James Marshall had died on August 11, while competing in a lightning tournament held as part of the British Chess Federation Congress in Edinburgh.

Three of the games were finished before the usual tea interval. Murray defeated Draper in 15 moves, Gibson and Gilchrist played a careful Ruy Lopez to a draw, and McKee defeated MacIsaac from a position with equal material but which gave him greater mobility. MacIsaac created a weakness in his position allowing McKee to win two pawns. So, at the break, Glasgow had a comfortable two point lead.

Shortly after the interval Wardhaugh, who had held a pawn advantage for some time, reduced that lead by winning against Birch. On the bottom board, Young made a weak move which handed the advantage to his opponent, although he later obtained an attack. Properly conducted, this should have been decisive, but he mishandled it and could do no more than draw. Meanwhile, on board six, Nichol had worked up an overwhelming king's side attack and he compelled his opponent to resign on move 45.

As this gave Glasgow a 4-2 lead, thereby securing the match, Longwill and Walsworth, whose game had by this time been reduced to a minor piece and seven pawns each, agreed a draw.

Alan McGowan