Scottish Championship 1931

compiled by Alan McGowan

The Scottish Championship [the 44 th _ held in Edinburgh ] resulted in a win for W. Gibson, his ninth success. We are informed this constitutes a record, the previous best being the late D.Y. Mills, who won it eight times.

(BCM 1931, February, p 74)

Scottish Championship 1931

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6

 

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W. Gibson

 

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G. Page

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J. Borthwick

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Dr. R.C. Macdonald

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A. Goldberg

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D, Simpson

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Nine times Scottish Champion

compiled by Alan McGowan

[From the British Chess Magazine, May 1932, p 201]

William Gibson, one of the leading figures in British chess, nine times Scottish Champion, died on March 27, aged 58. Born in Wigtonshire, the son of a schoolmaster, he was a lawyer by profession, joined the Glasgow Chess Club in 1901, and first won the Scottish Championship in 1907, a success he was to repeat on eight subsequent occasions. He won the West of Scotland Championship fourteen times and that of the Glasgow Club fifteen times.

On several occasions he played in the British Championship and was always a dangerous opponent, as his dramatic win against F.D.Yates at the Southport Congress of 1924 showed. [This should read Portsmouth/Southsea 1923, where he beat Yates in the last round. A draw would have given Yates a share of 1 st and 2 nd , and a win against Gibson would have given him the title outright. AMcG] One of his very best performances was at the Ransgate Easter Congress of 1929. In Premier “A” he scored 5½, winning first prize against such redoubtable experts as J.A.J Drewitt 5, L. Rellstab 5, A. Gibaud 3, D. Noteboom 3, A.G. Conde 2½, J.H. Morrison 2½, and H.H. Cole 1½.

Modest and unassuming, William Gibson worthily represented his country wherever he went, and Scotland is much the poorer for the loss of this powerful chessplayer and lovable character.

(In the obit 1907 is given as first year he won the Scottish. In the following Appreciation, 1906 is given. In the Scottish Centenary book, 1907 is given. AMcG)

WILLIAM GIBSON: AN APPRECIATION

[From the British Chess Magazine, June 1932, p 237]

Scottish chess circles have suffered a severe loss though the death of William Gibson, of Glasgow , on March 28. The tournament to determine his successor in the Scottish Championship was being held just at the time.

Born at Little Balsier in the parish of Sorbie, Wigtonshire, in May, 1873, Gibson, a son of the local schoolmaster, in due time became a solicitor in Glasgow .

He learned the moves of chess by watching his father and brother play together. Joining the Glasgow Chess Club in 1901, his powers developed steadily until he became the tower of strength that he has continued to be for 30 years or more. In 1906 he first secured the Scottish championship, repeating this performance at lessening intervals until at the date of his death he was holding it for the ninth time. Furthermore, he held the Glasgow C.C. championship fifteen times, and the West of Scotland championship fourteen times, while for several years past he had not lost a single match game of any kind in Scotland .

He has participated in the British championship, and scored some notable successes, and yet his achievements in this competition were scarcely up to the level of his undoubted talents. Most probably this was to be ascribed to insufficient match practice with really first-class opponents.

Highly imaginative and full of initiative, his earlier tendency to attack at all costs was controlled and curbed by wider experience until ultimately he became able to command success in his own country. A slight lack of physical robustness was fully balanced by quick perception and clear judgement, which enabled him to play with comparative speed without great effort. With all his victories in serious competitions, Gibson really loved chess as a recreation, and not quite so much of a business as such affairs are apt to be. His delight was to have a bout sans façon, with an opponent of like disposition, and then, free from responsibility as to the result, he could give free rein to a naturally lively temperament, to the amusement of such spectators as might be present. In illustration, an incident may be recalled. On one such occasion, a chess journalist was present, who, considering he had secured a news item of interest, published a comment on the relative scores of the two players. When the three met again, Gibson asked his opponent, who was unaware of what had transpired, whether he recalled the result of their sitting. Receiving the answer, evidently anticipated, “not the foggiest,” Gibson in firm but friendly fashion “ticked off” the journalist for publishing details of a personal and private nature. Of unassuming and amiable disposition, he disliked anything approaching pretension, and as to this another incident may be narrated. At one of the congresses he scored a game after a stubborn fight. The loser, being asked about what had happened explained, rather floridly, that although he had analysed a difficult position ten moves deep, Gibson, by going to twelve, had proved too much for him. The latter, being approached in turn about this tour de force , was definitely annoyed with what he held to be a “leg pull,” disliking moreover the innuendo implied, even in chaff.

It should be added that William Gibson's services to chess were by no means confined to over-the-board activities, for he occupied at one time or the other almost every post in the Glasgow C.C. and the Scottish Chess Association, as well as being a member of the Council of the British Chess Federation., and editor of the chess column of the Glasgow Weekly Herald. His gifted personality will be greatly missed.

*****

Ramsgate 1929 – Premier ‘A'

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W. Gibson

 

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J.A.J. Drewitt

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5

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L. Rellstab

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A. Gibaud

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D. Noteboom

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A.G. Conde

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J.H. Morrison

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H.H. Cole

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 BCM 1929, various reports, including the crosstable on p 171

That page included the following observations:

     In the premier Tournament, Section A, W. Gibson, the Scottish champion, played extremely well, losing only to J.A.J. Drewitt in the last round. Drewitt and Rellstab were undefeated, and Gibaud, the French champion, probably played the most brilliant chess of the whole congress. Noteboom, a very youthful Dutchman, had several protracted games and is a player of much promise. Conde's lack of regular practice told against him, and Morrison and Cole were also lower than expected

 

*****

Gibson,W - Yates,R [B08]
British Championship Portsmouth/Southsea (11), 1923

Notes are by Craig Pritchett in Scotland's Chess Centenary Book (1984), with additional notes in [ ] from BCM 1923.

1 d4 Nf6 2 Nf3 g6 3 Nc3 Bg7 4 e4 d6 5 Bd3!? Nc6 6 h3 0-0 7 Ne2!? Nd7!? [7 ..Nb4 gaining the bishop pair, equalises completely at this point. To a modern eye, White's opening idea - moves 5,6 and 7 - is completely lacking in sting.] 8 0-0 e5 9 c3 Qe8 10 Be3 h6 11 Qc2 Kh7 12 Rae1 Nd8? [Black plays too passively. Rather better is 12 ..exd4 13 Nexd4 Nce5] 13 Ng3 Ne6 14 Nf5! So that if 14...gxf5 15 exf5 and White regains his piece with advantage. Now Black must exchange his vital king's bishop, and comes under direct pressure on the kingside, where White can play for the break with f4. 14 ..f6 15 Nxg7 Kxg7 16 Nh4 g5 17 Nf5+ Kh7 18 g3 Rg8 19 Kh2 Ndf8 20 f4 Ng6 21 fxe5 fxe5 22 Rf2 Bd7 23 Ref1 Rd8 24 Qe2 Nh8 25 Bd2 Bc8 26 Qe3 a6 27 b4 Rd7 28 Bc4 Qg6 29 g4! [The BCM 1929, September, p 321, comments at this point: At move 29 he was judged by esperts to have a direct win, with a Kt sacrifice, but preferred to proceed in a ore leisurely way. AMcG] 29 ..Rf7 30 a3 Rgf8 31 Bc1 Qf6 32 Kg1 b5 33 Bd5 Qd8 34 h4! Rg8 35 Rh2 Rg6 36 hxg5 Nxg5 37 Bxf7 Nhxf7 38 Rh5 d5 39 dxe5 dxe4 40 Kh1 Nxe5 41 Nxh6 Rxh6 [Sealed, according to the BCM. AMcG] 42 Qxg5 Qxg5 43 Bxg5 Rxh5+ 44 gxh5 Be6 45 Bf4 Ng4 46 Kg2 c6 47 Kg3 Nf6 48 Kh4 Nd5 49 Be5 e3 50 Rf8 [and ten moves later Yates resigned. BCM 1923, p 321.] 1-0

 

 


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