Scottish Championship 1923

compiled by Alan McGowan

The week after Christmas, and contiguous with Hastings congress, the Scottish Association held a most successful tourney at Glasgow Chess Club. The major event was for the championship of Scotland, and an excellent entry was received, including five past champions.
The re-entry of Dr. R.C. Macdonald of Inverness, now a veteran in chess, had a vital bearing on the result, even though he has been absent for many years. He provided a remarkable finish to the championship on the closing day, for not only winning two adjourned games, he defeated the holder.
W. Gibson, as he has usually done in recent years, established a comfortable lead, and seemed a,ikely winner. The doctor had lost one game to Heath when in the last round he met Mr. Gibson, who had a clean score.
Playing his last game with the holder of the title he was at every disadvantage. He was Black; he was conceding the odds of the draw, for he required to win, whereas the half point was sufficient for his opponent. He had played almost continuously since 10 a.m., whereas Mr. Gibson’s game with Mr. Logie was over about noon, yet he took four successive points and tied.
Mr. Gibson played characteristically. Playing with great rapidity, he rarely seemed to hesitate over his move. Whenever his opponent made a blunder or a weak move he grasped the chance immediately, and when once he had the upper hand, soon brought the game to a conclusion.
Three players tied for third place: Messrs. C.B. Heath, of Dundee; G. Page, of Edinburgh; and A.J. Mackenzie, of Birmingham. All played well, though in different styles, and deserved their position. The last two should have drawn with Mr. Gibson, but Mr. Mackenzie tried to get more out of a level position than was there and was neatly trapped. Mr. Page dismissed a variation which would have drawn because he thought it lost. Mr. Heath was the only one of the three to score against the two leaders. He defeated the Inverness doctor, playing against him the King’s Gambit, which he has specially studied.
The last three did not do so well as their friends expected. Both Mr. Marshall and Mr. Borthwick seemed to feel the strain of the two rounds per day, and the latter player, who often got the better position in the first two hours, unaccountably weakened thereafter, and his score naturally suffered.
Mr. Logie played very vigorously in the mid-game, but suffered from making premature attacks, and he somewhat unnecessarily prolonged his final game against the Birmingham player. He has the consolation of knowing that it is no great disgrace to be last in such company.

The two Inverness players, Dr. Macdonald and Mr. H. Anderson-Robertson [who played in the Major] applied for a postponement of their first game as they only reached Glasgow at 1-30 on the opening day, after a somewhat trying experience. Leaving at 7 p.m., they had come through about one foot of snow at the top of Drumochter Pass, the highest point on the Highland line, and congratulated themselves on having crossed the summit. They had not got much firther, however, when they got into between two and three feet of snow, and as the doctor put it, “for three miles we had to dig ourselves out with the floor boards of the car.” They finally reached Perth at 8 a.m. and got breakfast, arriving at Glasgow at 1-30 p.m., having been over eighteen hours on the journey.
Both were much relieved on being granted a postponement of their first round game, which under the circumstances the committee had no hesitation in allowing, for they showed traces of their arduous struggle with the elements.
(British Chess Magazine 1923, February, pp 44-46)

The recent tie for the Scottish Championship between W. Gibson and Dr. R.C. Macdonald, will probablybe played off in April, as a date convenient to both gentlemen in that month.
(British Chess Magazine 1923, April, p 129)

The tie between W. Gibson, of Glasgow, and Dr. R.C. Macdonald, Inverness, for the chess championship of Scotland, was played off at Glasgow, and resulted in a win for the former by 1 win and 2 draws….The champion won the title first in 1907. This is his sixth victory, and third consecutively, and he thus becomes the permanent holder of the valuable cup presented to the S.C.A. by the late Rankine Simpson, of Edinburgh.
(British Chess Magazine 1923, May, p 181)

Scottish Championship 1923

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

 

1

W. Gibson

 

0

1

1

1

1

1

1

6

2

Dr. R.C. Macdonald

1

 

0

1

1

1

1

1

6

3

C.B. Heath

0

1

 

0

1

0

1

1

4

4

A.J. Mackenzie

0

0

1

 

0

1

1

1

4

5

G. Page

0

0

0

1

 

1

1

1

4

6

J. Borthwick

0

0

1

0

0

 

½

0

7

J. Marshall

0

0

0

0

0

½

 

1

8

A.V. Logie

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

 

1

 

 


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